Environmental Health Sciences

Environmental Health Sciences is a not-for-profit organization founded in 2002 to increase public understanding of the scientific links between environmental factors and human health.

We work in three areas – science, media and public education – to close the gap between good science and great policy.

EHS partners with organizations such as the Science Communication Network and Advancing Green Chemistry to help researchers develop the skills needed to present and communicate the complexities of environmental health to the public.

In partnership with Advancing Green Chemistry, EHS is developing tools and protocols that will help chemists reduce the likelihood that new chemicals they are bringing to market will be hazardous.

From its base in Charlottesville, Virginia, EHS also publishes two news websites, Environmental Health News and The Daily Climate. Edited by a team of experienced, award-winning journalists and environmental health experts, EHN and TDC offer original reporting and compile news stories from around the world to give a comprehensive daily look at the vital issues in science, environment and health.

Current News

Environmental Health News
March for Science: Crowds join global Earth Day protests. Crowds massed in the US capital and around the world Saturday to support science and evidence-based research -- a protest partly fueled by opposition to President Donald Trump's threats of budget cuts to agencies funding scientists' work. Apr 23, 2017
Why they march: "Science and scientists are under attack." The March for Science is a response to the Trump administration’s distaste for science — or at least the kind that gets in the way of profit — but it is also a celebration of those among us who have devoted their lives to understanding how the world works. Apr 23, 2017
How Western Civilisation could collapse. The political economist Benjamin Friedman once compared modern Western society to a stable bicycle whose wheels are kept spinning by economic growth. Should that forward-propelling motion slow or cease, the pillars that define our society – democracy, individual liberties, social tolerance and more – would begin to teeter. Apr 23, 2017
Scientists, feeling under siege, march against Trump policies. Thousands of scientists and their supporters, feeling increasingly threatened by the policies of President Trump, gathered in Washington on Saturday under rainy skies for what they called the March for Science. Apr 23, 2017
Giant waterfall in Antarctica worries scientists. Scientists poring over military and satellite imagery have mapped the unimaginable: a network of rivers, streams, ponds, lakes and even a waterfall, flowing over the ice shelf of a continent with an annual mean temperature of more than -50C. Apr 23, 2017
More…
The Daily Climate
March for Science: Crowds join global Earth Day protests. Crowds massed in the US capital and around the world Saturday to support science and evidence-based research -- a protest partly fueled by opposition to President Donald Trump's threats of budget cuts to agencies funding scientists' work. Apr 23, 2017
Why they march: "Science and scientists are under attack." The March for Science is a response to the Trump administration’s distaste for science — or at least the kind that gets in the way of profit — but it is also a celebration of those among us who have devoted their lives to understanding how the world works. Apr 23, 2017
How Western Civilisation could collapse. The political economist Benjamin Friedman once compared modern Western society to a stable bicycle whose wheels are kept spinning by economic growth. Should that forward-propelling motion slow or cease, the pillars that define our society – democracy, individual liberties, social tolerance and more – would begin to teeter. Apr 23, 2017
Scientists, feeling under siege, march against Trump policies. Thousands of scientists and their supporters, feeling increasingly threatened by the policies of President Trump, gathered in Washington on Saturday under rainy skies for what they called the March for Science. Apr 23, 2017
Giant waterfall in Antarctica worries scientists. Scientists poring over military and satellite imagery have mapped the unimaginable: a network of rivers, streams, ponds, lakes and even a waterfall, flowing over the ice shelf of a continent with an annual mean temperature of more than -50C. Apr 23, 2017
More…